Rafael Fajardo

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twentyfrancs:

THIS SUNDAY!
peoplesclimate.org

twentyfrancs:

THIS SUNDAY!

peoplesclimate.org

hisoker:

THATS HOW THEY DO THE PATTERN THING THE SQUARE THING MY WEEABOO HEART IS YELLING

(Source: vine.co)

Moxyland: South African Cyberpunk is a Beautifully Disturbing Thing.

kenyatta:

tacanderson:

image

In 2011 I was visiting South Africa for the first time and while I was there I stopped in a bookstore and wanted to find a South African sci-fi author. I picked up Zoo City, by Lauren Beukes and loved it. Zoo City isn’t exactly cyberpunk but it’s definitely dystopian and if I wanted to I could probably try and find a way to justify reviewing it here and maybe some day I while, but suffice it say, I was smitten and you should absolutely read it.

After reading Zoo City, I wanted to see what else Lauren Beukes had written and was shocked to find out that she had a pretty big underground cyberpunk hit, Moxyland. There were lots of sites and posts and articles about Moxyland. It had come out in 2008 why hadn’t I heard about it? Oh, I see. It came out in 2008 in the UK (where I was living at the time) but didn’t get released in the US until 2010.

Most of my UK cyberpunk friends are well familiar with Moxyland but most of my US friends still haven’t heard of it.

Moxyland is the only cyberpunk novel I’m aware of that’s set in South Africa, but there’s so many things that make South Africa a perfect setting. South Africa is a country with so much socio-political and economic change happening, it’s not hard to imagine one or two things upsetting the situation and turning it into a spiraling dystopia. But South Africa is also an incredibly optimistic country filled with so much potential.

A ruthless corporate-apartheid government with video games, biotech attack dogs, slippery online identities, a township soccer school, shocking cell phones, addictive branding, and genetically modified art. Taking hedonistic trends in society to their ultimate conclusions, this tale paints anything but a forecasted utopia.

Lauren Beukes writing style is unique and engaging but her vision of the future is thrilling and terrifying. By extrapolating current trends she creates a future that seems not just realistic but, at times, inevitable.

If you haven’t read Moxyland, you really should. If you have already read it let us know what you thought. If you have any recommendations for similar books let us know what they are.

boughted. thx for the rec, tacanderson!

likewise. woot!

(Source: wolfliving)

Images of the chute in New Braunfels, Texas, in the days prior to the existence of the Schlitterbahn.

iamdanw:

(via The Wet Stuff: Jeff Henry, Verrukt, and the Men Who Built the Great American Waterpark – Grantland.com)

iamdanw:

(via The Wet Stuff: Jeff Henry, Verrukt, and the Men Who Built the Great American Waterpark – Grantland.com)

image of my father emerging from the proto- or pre-Schlitterbahn water chute in New Braunfels. Added to augment the quote by iamdanw:

iamdanw:

“A Master Blaster can cost more than $1 million. Water parks responded by raising their admission fees. An adult ticket to Schlitterbahn New Braunfels now costs $51.99. But that increase had an unforeseen benefit. Customers were staying at water parks all day to get their fifty bucks’ worth. In the process, they were spending more at the concession stands. “By itself, Master Blaster is not necessarily an economically viable piece of equipment,” said Geoff Chutter, CEO of WhiteWater West, which licensed the technology from Henry. “But add food and beverage around it and all of a sudden it does incredibly well as an addition to the bottom line.””

The Wet Stuff: Jeff Henry, Verrukt, and the Men Who Built the Great American Waterpark – Grantland.com

rickjr7:

Vera Molnar, Slow Movement Roundabout, 1957

rickjr7:

Vera Molnar, Slow Movement Roundabout, 1957

reluctantconquistador:

Day 47: This is one of the first animations I ever made, and for something that took me some 7 minutes, I’m super proud of it.

reluctantconquistador:

Day 47: This is one of the first animations I ever made, and for something that took me some 7 minutes, I’m super proud of it.

nearyeyed:

Fibonacci
GOLDEN SECTIONS ON GOLDEN SECTIONS ON GOLDEN SECTIONS AHHH

nearyeyed:

Fibonacci

GOLDEN SECTIONS ON GOLDEN SECTIONS ON GOLDEN SECTIONS AHHH

hautepop:

A litmus test for the internet of things by Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino Aka what is an Internet Thing, and what another sort of Thing?

hautepop:

A litmus test for the internet of things
by Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino Aka what is an Internet Thing, and what another sort of Thing?

iamdanw:

(via How to design for thumbs in the Era of Huge Screens - Scott Hurff)

mirror and overlap to see the safe zones inclusive of we lefties

iamdanw:

(via How to design for thumbs in the Era of Huge Screens - Scott Hurff)

mirror and overlap to see the safe zones inclusive of we lefties

(Source: gailcarriger)

The evolution of culture is synonymous with the removal of ornament from objects of daily use.

-

Adolf Loos (1870–1933), from Ornament and Crime (1908)

Adolf Loos (1870–1933), from Ornament and Crime (1908)

reichsstadt, if you haven’t read already –– this will probably leave you with thoughts on how to perhaps think about the “new” minimalism? Nietzsche made fun of the whole turn towards simplicity in dress (without making fun of dandies) as indicative of intellectual prowess. It’s “Fashion and Modernity” in Human, All to Human. "Ornament and Crime" is a great essay, but when it comes to his dismissal of ornamentation as “primitive”/given the fascination with anthropology/the ways anthropology has been done…it squicks me out. Besides the whole “hurrr durrr durrr isn’t lack of ornament still a form of ornamentation lulz.” schpiel. There’s also an article by Anna Chave called "Minimalism and the Rhetoric of Power" David Batchelor does an amazing job of talking about the difference between minimalism-as-understood-in-the-art-world & minimalism-as-shorthand in relation to colour. It’s in “Chromophobia”, where he looks at the fear/distrust of colour. There’s a great primer on colour & interiors & chromophobia here.  I’ve found less about minimalism “as a lifestyle”, and more about it as an artistic/musical/sculptural/architectural practice. Although asceticism may be another way to filter minimalism here. I mean, the class bent is pretty obvious. Ditto a weird underlying sense of orientalism (a fascination with the purity of “Japanese design”), OR that whole Bauhaus/Scandanavian thing. Ditto the whole cleanliness & order thing. I would wonder about the relationship between minimalism & computers/computer programming/computer programming language/mathematics. Or even how minimalism gives off the appearance of being “timeless”/”of the future”/”eternal”. Certainly, the objects betray themselves by very virtue of what they’re made from/construction techniques, etc. Maybe I have a bad eye, but there are times when minimalism feels atemporal. …I have to think about that more, because I’m already disagreeing with myself.

(via sylvides)

(Source: sugarmeows)

nevver:

Massimo Vignelli

nevver:

Massimo Vignelli