Rafael Fajardo

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Lost Warhol artworks found on Amiga floppy discs from the 1980s

A team of art and computer experts salvaged more than two dozen images from an obsolete set of discs three decades after they were created.


ludo ergo sum

More Latino Than White Students Admitted to UC

The research reported in this book … shows that in the cases of well-managed firms… . good management was the most powerful reason they failed to stay atop their industries. Precisely because these firms listened to their customers, invested aggressively in new technologies that would provide their customers more and better products of the sort they wanted, and because they carefully studied market trends and systematically allocated investment capital to innovations that promised the best returns, they lost their positions of leadership.

What this implies at a deeper level is that many of what are now widely accepted principles of good management are, in fact, only situationally appropriate. There are times at which it is right not to listen to customers, right to invest in developing lower-performance products that promise lower margins, and right to aggressively pursue small, rather than substantial, markets. This book derives a set of rules, from carefully designed research and analysis of innovative successes and failures in the disk drive and other industries, that managers can use to judge when the widely accepted principles of good management should be followed and when alternative principles are appropriate.

- From the intro to Clayton Christensen’s Innovator’s Dilemma, which remains an incredibly provocative read after all these years. (via chaddickerson)

Gabriel García Márquez—a Rebel Against Form, an Artist Against the Forces of Oblivion

The climax of One Hundred Years of Solitude is famously based on a true historical event that took place shortly after García Márquez’s birth: in 1928, in the Magdalena banana zone on Colombia’s Caribbean coast, not far from where the author was born, the Colombian military opened fire on striking United Fruit Company plantation workers, killing an unknown number. In the novel, García Márquez uses this event to capture the profane fury of modern capital, so powerful it not only can dispossess land and command soldiers but control the weather. After the killing, the company’s US administrator, “Mr. Brown,” summons up an interminable whirlwind that washes away not only Macondo but any recollection of the massacre. The storm propels the reader forward toward the novel’s famous last line, where the last descendant of the Buendía family finds himself in a room reading a gypsy prophesy: everything he knew and loved would be “wiped out by the wind and exiled from the memory of men…because races condemned to one hundred years of solitude did not have a second opportunity on earth.”

It’s a powerful parable of imperialism. But the real wonder of the book is not the way it represented the past, including Colombia’s long history of violent civil war, but how it predicted the future.

One Hundred Years of Solitude first appeared in Spanish in Buenos Aires in May 1967, a moment when it was not at all clear that the forces of oblivion had the upper hand. That year, the Brazilian Paulo Freire, in exile in Chile and working with that country’s agrarian reform, published his first book, Education as the Practice of Freedom, which kicked off a revolution in pedagogy that shook Latin America’s top-down, learn-by-rote-memorization school system to its core. The armed and unarmed New Left, in Latin America and elsewhere, seemed to be in ascendance. In Chile, the Popular Unity coalition would soon elect Salvador Allende president. In Argentina, radical Peronists were on the march. Even in military-controlled Brazil, there was a thaw. Che in Bolivia still had a few months left.

In other words, the doom forecast in One Hundred Years was not at all foregone. But within just a few years of the novel’s publication, the tide, with Washington’s encouragement and Henry Kissinger’s blessing, turned. By the end of the 1970s, military regimes ruled the continent and Operation Condor was running a transnational assassination campaign. Then, in the 1980s in Central America, Washington would support genocide in Guatemala, death squads in El Salvador and homicidal “freedom fighters” in Nicaragua.

cinoh:

Max Bill, Ulmer Hocker (Ulm stool), 1954
Check the footwear

cinoh:

Max Bill, Ulmer Hocker (Ulm stool), 1954

Check the footwear

(Source: palmhus)

code drawing 59 various states, made with Hopscotch

code drawing 58 states 02 and 03, made with Hopscotch

code drawing 57 various states, made with Hopscotch

code drawing 56 various states, made with Hopscotch

code drawing 55 various states, made with Hopscotch iOS app

newyorker:

In this week’s issue of the magazine, Margaret Talbot looks at the scanning technology responsible for some of Hollywood’s most lifelike special effects, and how it may drastically change the actor’s role in filmmaking (subscription required): http://nyr.kr/1mvOS8G
Rendering Credit: Dan Roarty, Jay Busch, Christopher Nichols, and Paul Debevec.

newyorker:

In this week’s issue of the magazine, Margaret Talbot looks at the scanning technology responsible for some of Hollywood’s most lifelike special effects, and how it may drastically change the actor’s role in filmmaking (subscription required): http://nyr.kr/1mvOS8G

Rendering Credit: Dan Roarty, Jay Busch, Christopher Nichols, and Paul Debevec.

Well, I didn’t — I wouldn’t think that. I thought, you know, you push a button, it goes right to the other thing.

- Chief justice John Roberts, realizing that texts are routed through a service provider (via maxistentialist)

kchayka:

natashavc:

TOUCH THIS SKIN

#writeradvice

Contents Under Pressure

iamuhura:

ruckawriter:

I rarely use this to just blog. I’m going to just blog now, so you can all just ignore this if it’s not to your liking.

Warning. Contents under pressure.

Read More

Wow. Greg Rucka is super for reals not here for your sexist bullshit in nerd or geek communities. Also, something that stuck out to me was this passage:

"Portland Public Schools has a lottery system to get into its magnet programs. For two years, our daughter has been dreaming of attending one specific middle school, one that’s art focused. She’s been in a science-and-math magnet program, and she’s done very well there, mind, but the social aspect… it’s been grinding her down. She was looking to escape. She was looking to go to a place where, she imagined, she could be who she is and not suffer for it."

His daughter, thriving academically in the math and science program is looking to leave for an art program because the SOCIAL ASPECT (read: sexist microaggressions based on her gender) is wearing her down.

She’s 10.

And what’s devastating to me and so many others who will nod their heads while reading this post is that even if she overcomes this particular gauntlet and sticks with science and math? There’s going to be another one. And another one. And another one. All through high school, undergrad, graduate school, her first job, her entire career. Until she quits because she just can’t take another day of suffering to be simply who she is. Because there’s not enough support or resources or even people acknowledging that it is a *systemic* problem that needs to be addressed at every level.

How bad do things have to get?

elmerseason:

#shells#yoni#doorways#becoming#exchange#value#respect#money

And santeria  token

elmerseason:

And santeria  token

(Source: niuginistyl33)