Rafael Fajardo

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Posts tagged with "art"

A few minutes after I gave this address, an audience member approached me privately and asked whether I was a Marxist. Surprised, I asked him why he thought I might be. He said it was because I had “reduced” the lofty subject of art to a mere question of labour. (Paraphrasing mine.)

To him I’d like to say, Mister, I am an artist who supports herself on the strength of her art and her ability to keep producing it. You’d be hard put to convince any artist that art isn’t work. And you can’t convince me that there’s no art to labour. You can’t convince me that art and the labour that creates it can be easily teased apart and considered as separate objects, and you sure as hell can’t convince me that the latter is somehow base and impoverished in comparison to the former.

- Nalo Hopkinson, “Report from Planet Midnight” (via thestoutorialist)

(Source: doskapozora)

Jun 6

Critical Toy, work in progress, second attempt.

Model was reduced in scale be a fraction, from 3.5” in the x dimension to 3.25”. The y and z dimensions were scaled proportionately.

Work piece (block of Freeman jewelers’ wax) was moved +1 cm in the x and y from the origin. Last time I had tried to put the work piece on the origin, with poor results. The device insists on a 0.129” margin around the work piece. I don’t know why.

This is the result after both the draft and finish passes. Altogether this took two and a half hours, including the time to perform “surfacing” or planing.

I saved the parameters so that I can plane the results of the first attempt and mate it with this one to see if the pegs match the diameters of the holes, or if they will need manual finishing with a dremel.

Next step would be to create channels for sprue.

nprfreshair:

Tomorrow is Willie Nelson’s 80th birthday. He might just be the coolest 80-year-old out there.
For some Willie reading, last year Texas Monthly did an oral history of outlaw country — “That Seventies Show”:

Up to that point, the cosmic cowboys had played to crowds that looked largely like they did. Willie brought a different audience; though he’d never made it big as a performer nationally, he’d always been able to fill a Texas honky-tonk. Once he figured out how to bring the hippies and the rednecks together, the scene grew into something no one had seen before. Most folks have always credited that to his innate charisma, to the idea that Austin was the place where Willie was finally allowed to be Willie. But the fact is, Willie came to town with a specific goal in mind: building a scene that would allow him to ignore Nashville completely. And he pulled that off with more than luck and a smile. 

A Fresh Air interview with the birthday boy.
HT The Morning News
Image via Bronx Banter

Willie created a specific geographic and economic context for his art. The part about being able to ignore Nashville is tremendously important.

nprfreshair:

Tomorrow is Willie Nelson’s 80th birthday. He might just be the coolest 80-year-old out there.

For some Willie reading, last year Texas Monthly did an oral history of outlaw country — “That Seventies Show”:

Up to that point, the cosmic cowboys had played to crowds that looked largely like they did. Willie brought a different audience; though he’d never made it big as a performer nationally, he’d always been able to fill a Texas honky-tonk. Once he figured out how to bring the hippies and the rednecks together, the scene grew into something no one had seen before. Most folks have always credited that to his innate charisma, to the idea that Austin was the place where Willie was finally allowed to be Willie. But the fact is, Willie came to town with a specific goal in mind: building a scene that would allow him to ignore Nashville completely. And he pulled that off with more than luck and a smile.

A Fresh Air interview with the birthday boy.

HT The Morning News

Image via Bronx Banter

Willie created a specific geographic and economic context for his art. The part about being able to ignore Nashville is tremendously important.

yourplasticbag:

DIS
read this essay by Nick Faust in Dis

yourplasticbag:

DIS

read this essay by Nick Faust in Dis

hautepop:

via cibelle:

Transparent Business Coffee Shop #newtrend?! #hunt;darton cafe on Lower Clapton road


I like this. There’s lots of talk about “transparency” vis-a-vis the “social business”, which is mostly just jargon but here it is in action.

I also think it’s likely to be good business sense - it brings the customer into the workings of the business and you can see how buying your coffee helps them. There’s also a motive to return, to see how they’re doing next week. (Well, if you’re a data wonk like me!) The British love an underdog, so while takings are pretty tiddly like this, I think it’ll make people feel more involved in the business.

Sorry, did I say ‘business’? I meant ‘experience’. Not just a cafe, also an “interactive art installation”. Oh Hackney…


All encompassing hosts Hunt & Darton expose the inner workings of their business by presenting everything as art – from the public display of their bank balance to the lovingly handpicked charity shop crockery.

Well, know thy customer…

Still, I do wish twee and ironic gourmet coffee wasn’t a Thing.

hautepop:

via cibelle:

Transparent Business Coffee Shop #newtrend?! #hunt;darton cafe on Lower Clapton road

I like this. There’s lots of talk about “transparency” vis-a-vis the “social business”, which is mostly just jargon but here it is in action.

I also think it’s likely to be good business sense - it brings the customer into the workings of the business and you can see how buying your coffee helps them. There’s also a motive to return, to see how they’re doing next week. (Well, if you’re a data wonk like me!) The British love an underdog, so while takings are pretty tiddly like this, I think it’ll make people feel more involved in the business.

Sorry, did I say ‘business’? I meant ‘experience’. Not just a cafe, also an “interactive art installation”. Oh Hackney…

All encompassing hosts Hunt & Darton expose the inner workings of their business by presenting everything as art – from the public display of their bank balance to the lovingly handpicked charity shop crockery.

Well, know thy customer…

Still, I do wish twee and ironic gourmet coffee wasn’t a Thing.

nprfreshair:

Folks. Important religious artifacts here.
Beautiful Decay:

After unknowingly purchasing fake pre-Colombian artifacts, artist Nadín Ospina gave serious thought to Latin-American culture and its ancient roots.  His sculptures depicts pop-culture cartoon characters such as Snoopy, Micky Mouse, and Bart Simpson in an often pre-Colombian style.


We were in a show together in Denver’s Museo de las Americas called Planet Colombia. His work rocks.

nprfreshair:

Folks. Important religious artifacts here.

Beautiful Decay:

After unknowingly purchasing fake pre-Colombian artifacts, artist Nadín Ospina gave serious thought to Latin-American culture and its ancient roots.  His sculptures depicts pop-culture cartoon characters such as Snoopy, Micky Mouse, and Bart Simpson in an often pre-Colombian style.

We were in a show together in Denver’s Museo de las Americas called Planet Colombia. His work rocks.

The M.I.A. book foreword

vandlo:

I met Maya in 1998 at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. She joined the film degree program late, with no interview. She just blagged her way in on the phone and turned up halfway through the term.

We all dressed in dark colors and talked serious art theory. Maya wore skintight pink jeans and stilettos, she had pink lipstick and fingernails, and she couldn’t spell. Her accent was South London, but her grammar was always kind of off and she wasn’t very articulate, didn’t talk much in class (and 90 percent of the degree was talking because we didn’t have much equipment)

She wasn’t a stand-out student.

Read More

likeafieldmouse:

Alicia Framis & Nacho Alegre - Lost Astronaut (2009)

so many feels

Mar 5
criticaltoys:

critical toy sketch 2013 03 05 04

criticaltoys:

critical toy sketch 2013 03 05 04

Mar 5
criticaltoys:

toy sketch 3

criticaltoys:

toy sketch 3

Mar 5
criticaltoys:

toy sketch

criticaltoys:

toy sketch

Mar 5
criticaltoys:

toy

criticaltoys:

toy

Feb 8
Bryan Waddell captured a contextual portrait of me by Google AdAware.

Bryan Waddell captured a contextual portrait of me by Google AdAware.

visual-poetry:

“quoted (»is that a quotation, i asked…« jorge luis borges)” by joseph kosuth (+)
(photographer: susanne ullerich)

visual-poetry:

“quoted (»is that a quotation, i asked…« jorge luis borges)” by joseph kosuth (+)

(photographer: susanne ullerich)

To give a brief explanation of art that is no longer art: Sometimes the cost of restoring a work of art exceeds the value of the work, in which case the insurer declares a total loss, and the work is declared no longer art—that is, of no market value. The damage can range from obvious to subtle—from a ripped painting or shattered sculpture to a wrinkle in a photographic print, or mold damage which can’t be seen at all. As it wouldn’t do to send the not-artwork to the crematorium—the work might be of scholarly value, or might one day be worth repairing, or might one day be more easily repaired—the work is stored, not dead, but in a state of indefinite coma. (via What happens to art that gets damaged? No Longer Art at Columbia, reviewed. - Slate Magazine)

To give a brief explanation of art that is no longer art: Sometimes the cost of restoring a work of art exceeds the value of the work, in which case the insurer declares a total loss, and the work is declared no longer art—that is, of no market value. The damage can range from obvious to subtle—from a ripped painting or shattered sculpture to a wrinkle in a photographic print, or mold damage which can’t be seen at all. As it wouldn’t do to send the not-artwork to the crematorium—the work might be of scholarly value, or might one day be worth repairing, or might one day be more easily repaired—the work is stored, not dead, but in a state of indefinite coma. (via What happens to art that gets damaged? No Longer Art at Columbia, reviewed. - Slate Magazine)