Rafael Fajardo

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Posts tagged with "design"

Dec 8

futurescope:

Project 2020 by Trendmicro and ICSPA

Pretty. This is something I’ve never seen. Or at least rarely. First a scenario process with a report, then a scifi series based on the results. More like this please. Well done. To all filmmakers out there: If you need help with the scenarios, contact us! We’d love to help.

Project 2020 is a cyber security web series designed to get industry, business, government and other security dependent stakeholders thinking about the cyber threats which may face them at the end of the decade so we can all better prepare for the future.

"2020" is the story about the near future based on an ICSPA (International Cyber Security Protection Alliance) report entitled Project 2020. This video project takes the form of a fictional web series presenting the evolution of society and technology in the world described by the report. We will show how the advancement of mobile and cloud based technology has influenced the way we interact with other and with the world, how we work and how we perceive reality.

[Download the Report] [Watch the 9 episodes]

Mar 5
criticaltoys:

critical toy sketch 2013 03 05 04

criticaltoys:

critical toy sketch 2013 03 05 04

Mar 5
criticaltoys:

toy sketch 3

criticaltoys:

toy sketch 3

Mar 5
criticaltoys:

toy sketch

criticaltoys:

toy sketch

Mar 5
criticaltoys:

toy

criticaltoys:

toy

Designers are liars all design is a lie

jamesbranch:

Thanks to @juspar who flagged this post on Sean Sturm’s blog which features the essay About the Word Design (Flusser, 1991) published in Eine Kleine Philosophie des Design (1993) a reference to either Coldcut or Mozart. Anyway… In it Flusser analyses the origins of the word ‘design’ and suggests that trickery and deception were bound up in this term from the start…

As a noun, it means — among other things “intention,” “plan,” “intent,” “aim,” “scheme,” “plot,” “motif,” “basic structure,” all these (and other meanings) being connected with “cunning” and “deception.” As a verb (“to design”), meanings include “to concoct something,” “to simulate“… (Flusser, 1991)

He goes on to describe how for Plato the arts and technology were a deception because they ‘betray’ and ‘distort’ ideas when they transfer them to the material world… Shifting forward to the end of 19th century he states that design held a unique position in that it brought together the previously opposed domains of art and technology. This design culture that emerged was aware, “of the fact that it was deceptive [i.e. designed]”

Begs the question — who is being deceived? — Using the example of a lever he establishes design as an enabler of super human feats i.e. to lift weight beyond the limits of our natural capabilities. So, it is nature who is the victim, being deceived by the act of design… In fact “Being a human being is a design against nature.” (Flusser, 1991)

Today he argues that this word ‘design’ has become the focus of much discourse and general chit chat with the question of ‘design’ possibly replacing that of the ‘idea’. Using the example of plastic pens he asks where the value resides in these objects, when the production labour is largely automated, the materials are worth very little…only the design is of value as it represent a coming together of great ideas that ensure its function. And yet this is a design we don’t notice and the ideas behind it are ignored along with the labour and production. How can we explain this devaluation of all values? he asks?

Once the barrier between art and technology had been broken down, a new perspective opened up within which one could create more and more perfect designs, escape one’s circumstances more and more, live more and more artistically (beautifully). But [-] the price we pay for this is the loss of truth and authenticity. (Flusser, 1991)

He points out that if everything becomes perfectly designed artefacts there is no truth and authenticity and everything becomes disposable. The same is true of us we do ultimately just die. He claims the word design remains key in discourse because we are “beginning to lose faith in art and technology as sources of value. Because we are starting to wise up to the design behind them.” (Flusser, 1991)

For me as someone interested in lying (or design) this raises pressing questions. How do we find meaning and value in this activity? Should we just down tools and shuffle off this mortal coil? We can point to many things designed today show contempt for labour, ecology and ideas but what does the opposite look like? Design that respects ecology, design that dignifies the lives of those that make and use them? Design that embodies ideas respectfully rather than exploiting them? Starting to sound like the values espoused by Victor Papaneck.  To be cont…

from prior post

explore-blog:

I had the pleasure of discussing the “Modulor” at some length with Professor Albert Einstein at Princeton. I was then passing through a period of great uncertainty and stress; I expressed myself badly, I explained the “Modulor” badly, I got bogged down in the morass of “cause and effect”… At one point, Einstein took a pencil and began to calculate. Stupidly, I interrupted him, the conversation turned to other things, the calculation remained unfinished. The friend who had brought me was in the depths of despair. In a letter written to me the same evening, Einstein had the kindness to say this of the “Modulor”: “It is a scale of proportions which makes the bad difficult and the good easy.” There are some who think this judgement is unscientific. For my part, I think it is extraordinarily clear-sighted. It is a gesture of friendship made by a great scientist towards us who are not scientists but soldiers on the field of battle. The scientist tells us: “This weapon shoots straight: in the matter of dimensioning, i.e. of proportions, it makes tour task more certain.”
Le Corbusier meets Albert Einstein at Princeton in 1946, traveling to New York to present at the United Nations his project for the UN Headquarters. Complement with this beautiful definition of science as “systematic wonder.”

explore-blog:

I had the pleasure of discussing the “Modulor” at some length with Professor Albert Einstein at Princeton. I was then passing through a period of great uncertainty and stress; I expressed myself badly, I explained the “Modulor” badly, I got bogged down in the morass of “cause and effect”… At one point, Einstein took a pencil and began to calculate. Stupidly, I interrupted him, the conversation turned to other things, the calculation remained unfinished. The friend who had brought me was in the depths of despair. In a letter written to me the same evening, Einstein had the kindness to say this of the “Modulor”: “It is a scale of proportions which makes the bad difficult and the good easy.” There are some who think this judgement is unscientific. For my part, I think it is extraordinarily clear-sighted. It is a gesture of friendship made by a great scientist towards us who are not scientists but soldiers on the field of battle. The scientist tells us: “This weapon shoots straight: in the matter of dimensioning, i.e. of proportions, it makes tour task more certain.”

Le Corbusier meets Albert Einstein at Princeton in 1946, traveling to New York to present at the United Nations his project for the UN Headquarters. Complement with this beautiful definition of science as “systematic wonder.”

my archive homework: Basic Principles of Design by Manfred Maier, of the Kunstgewerbeschule, Basel Switzerland, 1975.

my archive homework: Basic Principles of Design by Manfred Maier, of the Kunstgewerbeschule, Basel Switzerland, 1975.

Made with Paper

Made with Paper

Apr 6
slavin:

I’m pretty sure this was not intended to be satirical.  (Taken with instagram)

slavin:

I’m pretty sure this was not intended to be satirical. (Taken with instagram)

I am thinking of giving away my collection of Graphis, Communication Arts, ID, Wired, and Print magazines. They should go to a good home, not landfill. I’m not fully decided. This isn’t a whim. I’m reflecting on the consequences. On my emotional attachment to the artifacts that may historicize late 20th century design practices.

kenyatta:

Participate: Designing with User Generated Content

Nowadays, many of the tools of production and distribution used by graphic designers are available to the broader public. And not only are members of the public turning into amateur designers, they are also invited by professionals to contribute to their creative process. The book addresses the curiosity of the amateur of course but it also talks to professional designers (or artists) who fear that they might be trampled underfoot by distributed amateur creatives.

Participate is a introductory book for anyone who is interested in the impact that networked co-creativity has on design, graphic design but also on other fields such as typography, silk-screening, craft, fashion, advertising, etc. Each chapter analyzes one of the key components of participatory design: community (or what drives people to participate in the absence of a financial compensation), modularity (the groups of units that makes up a larger system), flexibility (making branding more elastic) and technology (or why code is ‘the new literacy.’)

This seems very much a book about community design as it relates to graphic design. Filing away under ‘useful.’

Read the rest of Regine’s review here. read more about the book here.

Overlooking The Visual reviewed in Design Research News

BOOK REVIEW

Kathryn Moore, Overlooking the Visual: Demystifying the Art of
Design
(Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2010).

Reviewed by Gareth Doherty, Graduate School of Design, Harvard
University, Cambridge, Mass.

In this mesmerising book, Kathryn Moore turns traditional
assumptions about design, and design education, upside down and
inside out. Moore tells us that “a radical redefinition of the
relationship between the senses and intelligence is long overdue”
(1), and not just demolishes existing perceptions, but through
the 254-page book, offers a vision for the re-conceptualization,
and teaching, of design.

Moore tells us it all went wrong with the Enlightenment when an
overt rationalism became dominant, relegating the sensual,
including visual, knowledge to the sidelines (17). “The crux of
the problem,” says Moore, “is that an intractable rationalist
paradigm dominates our thinking to such a degree we no longer
give it much thought” (6). Materiality becomes separated from
intelligence but, Moore argues, to consciously adopt a
specifically sensual approach serves to acknowledge this
difference and reinforce the binary. Influenced by philosophers
such as Gilbert Ryle, Hilary Putnam, and Richard Rorty, Moore
suggests that in order to re-evaluate the way we think about
design, designers need to engage with ideas at all stages of the
design process and that artistic practice needs to engage with
“space, words, shadow, light and form” (9).

We cannot understand theory without practice and vice versa, and
this integration of the theoretical and practical is inherent
within the book itself where copious illustrations and design
projects are as every bit integral to the book’s argument than
the text itself. The sequence of images of a sublime sea remind
us that the sea has smell, color, and memories. Just like the
visual. Part of Moore’s argument is that the visual is not just
about what we see but is itself a political and emotional
construct. Through eight highly engaging chapters, with titles
such as “The sensory interface and other myths and legends,”
“Teaching the unknowable,” and “Objectivity without neutrality,”
Moore outlines a vision for landscape architectural education
with design at its core.

The book is dense and theoretical, but well written and lucid. It
fits within a growing literature on the anthropology of design,
and a movement in design away from the design of objects and
processes to the understanding of context and how and why we
design. Moore has a lot in common with artists like Olafur
Eliasson, who sees the political ramifications of the emotions,
and anthropologists like Albena Yavena, who recently published an
ethnography on the design process of the Office for Metropolitan
Architecture. Not alone does Moore outline the problems with
design education but proposes alternative models. This active
agency of the designer that comes through in the book is part of
the reason this book, or chapters thereof, should be essential
reading for design educators, and students, and indeed for anyone
interested in processes of design.

Kathryn Moore is a Professor at the Birmingham Institute of Art
and Design, Birmingham City University, UK. Moore is past
President of the Landscape Institute, the UK representative of
IFLA, and an experienced educator and practitioner.

(Source: jiscmail.ac.uk)

on my bookshelf

on my bookshelf

(Source: namashco)

A Real Web Design Application | Jason Santa Maria